| 

Horicon Marsh largest freshwater cattail marsh in the United States- Wisconsin DNR

Category: destinations

 4 weeks ago by Keith Worrall  60

Modified 4 weeks ago at 4 weeks ago

FOLLOW Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources

The largest freshwater cattail marsh in the United States is here in Wisconsin.

Right now, Horicon Marsh is twittering and chattering with the sounds of migrating songbirds and waterfowl as they make their way to summer breeding grounds. Visitors can strike out on a hike from the Education and Visitor Center, go for a paddle or attend any number of hands-on events for wildlife enthusiasts of all ages. (Check out our bird festival coming up May 9-13!) Whatever the weather, visitors can check out the hands-on Explorium, complete with an airboat simulator.

One of the marsh’s key species is the humble muskrat. These little lodge builders work hard to maintain open waterways, eating cattails and making room for diverse plant, animal and bird species. They’re also an important food source for other species like bobcats and raptors.

In the winter, Horicon remains active with trappers who come to its icy waterways in search of muskrat and other furbearer species. We also host one of the biggest candlelight hikes in the area every January.

If you’re a lover of Wisconsin wildlife, plan your next outdoor adventure here at Horicon!

Learn more: https://dnr.wi.gov/…/l…/wildlifeareas/horicon/education.html

The largest freshwater cattail marsh in the United States is here in Wisconsin. Right now, Horicon Marsh is twittering and chattering with the sounds of migrating songbirds and waterfowl as they make their way to summer breeding grounds. Visitors can strike out on a hike from the Education and Visitor Center, go for a paddle or attend any number of hands-on events for wildlife enthusiasts of all ages. (Check out our bird festival coming up May 9-13!) Whatever the weather, visitors can check out the hands-on Explorium, complete with an airboat simulator. One of the marsh's key species is the humble muskrat. These little lodge builders work hard to maintain open waterways, eating cattails and making room for diverse plant, animal and bird species. They're also an important food source for other species like bobcats and raptors.In the winter, Horicon remains active with trappers who come to its icy waterways in search of muskrat and other furbearer species. We also host one of the biggest candlelight hikes in the area every January.If you're a lover of Wisconsin wildlife, plan your next outdoor adventure here at Horicon!Learn more: https://dnr.wi.gov/topic/lands/wildlifeareas/horicon/education.html

Posted by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources on Monday, April 29, 2019

More like this